Tag Archives: KAPIII

GPS Training Day 2

New High Precision GPS Equipment for Kiribati

GPS Training Day 2

GPS Training Day 2

The shoreline and infrastructure assets are key elements of daily life in South Tarawa. Until now the accurate mapping and monitoring of these things has been undertaken using basic survey equipment and low accuracy GPS equipment. A new high precision state of the art GPS equipment has been purchased to improve the accuracy of measurement and recording of information in South Tarawa. The equipment was put to use on Tuesday 10th February with the first training workshop completed.

The equipment, worth in excess of $40,000, has been bought under the KAP III program and will be made available to the Ministry of Public Works and Utilities (MPWU), the Ministry of Environment, Lands and Agricultural Development (MELAD) and the Public Utilities Board (PUB) to vastly improve the speed and accuracy of the survey work they undertake. It is expected that the MPWU will use the equipment for monitoring shoreline erosion and will be able to quantify erosions rates to identify areas most of need of reinforcement. The PUB will use the equipment to accurately locate the water, electricity and sewer pipes, cables and fittings so that they can be relocated if they become buried over time. The MELAD officers will be able to use the equipment to more accurately define land boundaries and remark boundaries where necessary.

Part of the purchase included a week of training by Mr Rob van Manen, a GPS expert from Brisbane Australia. Rob described the new GPS system as being similar to that many fisherman might use and still used the same satellites but was far more accurate by being able to track more satellites and it was able to correct for the inaccuracies found in basic GPS units used for fishing. Rob praised the staff from MPWU, PUB and MELAD who undertook the training and noted they had all learned how to use the equipment very quickly and the days in the field with each ministry to show how to use the equipment in their normal daily tasks had been very productive.

Mid Term Review Team during the wrap up meeting

KAPIII Mid Term Review

 

Mid Term Review Team during wrap up meeting

Mid Term Review Team during wrap up meeting

The Government of Kiribati, The World Bank Team together with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT – Australia) conducted a Mid-Term Review on the Kiribati Adaptation Program Phase – III (KAPIII) from 30 Oct to 6 Nov 2014.

Consultations was carried out with major key stakeholders like the Office of Te Beretitenti, Ministry of Public Works and Utilities, Ministry of Environment Lands and Agricultural Development , Ministry of Internal Affairs, Ministry of Finance and Economic Development, Public Utilities Board and others.

KAPIII was implemented since March 2012 and it has been two and half years since its official commencement date.

The mission highlighted some of the achievements which included the substantial implementation of the leak measurement and detection program on the PUB transmission main, confirming locations for the abstraction galleries that witnessed land owners sign the voluntary land use agreement in North Tarawa, completed designs for rainwater harvesting systems based on community consultations, engagement of a Water Governance advisor assisting the GoK Task Force to address issues on both Bonriki and Buota Water Reserve to name a few.

One of the many positive outcomes of the mission was that the Government of Kiribati has confirmed its determination to complete the project on time (i.e. through 31 August 2016) and within budget. It also endorsed strengthening the management to undertake the large remaining tasks, including completing the seawalls, leak repairs, rain water harvesting and abstraction galleries using local contractors. Overall the outcome of the KAPIII mid-term review had been productive.

Mid Term Review Team during wrap up meeting

KAPIII Mid Term Review

 

Mid Term Review Team during wrap up meeting

Mid Term Review Team during wrap up meeting

The Government of Kiribati, The World Bank Team together with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT – Australia) conducted a Mid-Term Review on the Kiribati Adaptation Program Phase – III (KAPIII) from 30 Oct to 6 Nov 2014.

Consultations was carried out with major key stakeholders like the Office of Te Beretitenti, Ministry of Public Works and Utilities, Ministry of Environment Lands and Agricultural Development, Ministry of Internal Affairs, Ministry of Finance and Economic Development, Public Utilities Board and others.

KAPIII was implemented since March 2012 and it has been two and half years since its official commencement date.

The mission highlighted some of the achievements which included the substantial implementation of the leak measurement and detection program on the PUB transmission main, confirming locations for the abstraction galleries that witnessed land owners sign the voluntary land use agreement in North Tarawa, completed designs for rainwater harvesting systems based on community consultations, engagement of a Water Governance advisor assisting the GoK Task Force to address issues on both Bonriki and Buota Water Reserve to name a few.

One of the many positive outcomes of the mission was that the Government of Kiribati has confirmed its determination to complete the project on time (i.e. through 31 August 2016) and within budget.  It also endorsed strengthening the management to undertake the large remaining tasks, including completing the seawalls, leak repairs, rain water harvesting and abstraction galleries using local contractors.  Overall the outcome of the KAPIII mid-term review had been productive.

Land owner from Tabonibara, North Tarawa, signs the voluntary land use agreement

Location confirmed for infiltration galleries in North Tarawa

 

Land owner from Tabonibara, North Tarawa, signs the voluntary land use agreement

Land owner from Tabonibara, North Tarawa, signs the voluntary land use agreement

Landowners in Nooto and Tabonibara villages of Rural Tarawa have willingly signed off an agreement for the voluntary use of their lands for water infiltration galleries, thanks to an extensive and exhaustive KAPIII community consultation undertaking.

The signing was witnessed by the Australian High Commissioner to Kiribati HE. Mr. George Fraser, Kiribati’s Finance Minister Hon.Tom Murduch and the Minister for Commerce Hon. Pinto Katia.

A total of 7 landowners for Tabonibara and 11 for Nooto signed the agreement to declare their land for infiltration galleries which will be a reserve area for water, where no housing, graves or bwabwai pits will be found.

To safeguard the endangered fresh water from the effects of climate change and as part of an adaptation measure KAPIII will be funding the two infiltration galleries, which will provide the people of Nooto and Tabonibara villages with fresh clean water to drink from in relation to climate change and salt water intrusion.

Acknowledging the generosity made by the landowners, The Australian High Commissioner to Kiribati in his speech said. “Your permission to use this land for the galleries will be a key legacy from you to future generations, and one that will help improve your own livelihoods, those of your family, friends and community.”

“Australia, as a development partner, recognizes the importance of assisting your government to improve sustainable access to freshwater, and so we are pleased to support the third phase of the Kiribati Adaptation Project which aims to improve resilience to the impacts of climate change on fresh water supply.” He added.

“The signing that we have seen today signifies a major landmark in the progressive development of the project. It gives us a strong feeling that the project will surely be accomplished in the not distant future.” North Tarawa Mayor, Harry Tekaiti.

The Minister of Finance, Tom Murdoch on behalf of the Government of Kiribati thanked the land owners and called on the people of Tabonibara to safeguard the infiltration galleries not just for today but for their future generations.

An Infiltration gallery at the Taborio School in North Tarawa was erected during KAPII and its success has trickled the allocation of AUD$372,000 out of the $10.8 million project for the two infiltration galleries in Nooto and in Tabonibara, under KAPIII.

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The Tamana Pump. Photo by: Carlo Iocovino

Water supply in Kiribati: Local solution

The Tamana Pump. Photo by: Carlo Iocovino

The Tamana Pump. Photo by: Carlo Iocovino

Press release: SPREP

The atoll of Tamana, in Southern Kiribati, is the origin of a pump design that has helped thousands of communities in the Pacific Island nation.

Now known across Kiribati and internationally as the Tamana Pump, the design is a simple hand powered system that can greatly reduce water contamination by allowing pumping from closed wells.

“It is essential to have a pump rather than use a bucket or a tin container to bring water. This common system of using a container on a string contaminates the well water” said Hon. Waysang Kumkee, Minister for Public Works and Utility (pictured below).

Hon. Waysang Kumkee, Minister for the Ministry of Works and Public Utilities. Photo: Azarel Marina
Hon. Waysang Kumkee, Minister for the Ministry of Works and Public Utilities. Photo: Azarel Marina

 On the remote outer islands of Kiribati, maintenance and spare parts might be many months away when the next supply ship or qualified technician arrives. But the Tamana pump has no electronics or complicated mechanical parts, allowing it to be repaired more easily if a system breaks down. Furthermore, it is a system that is well known enough the many community members are capable of repairing them themselves.

“If we can have 1 water tank to service a small community with a manual pump and try to avoid having an electrical pump, because our problem is maintenance and servicing, no one can actually look after it if it breaks. A manual pump, or gravity feed system, is the best long term solution” said the Hon. Waysang Kumkee.

SPREP has undertaken assessments on Abaiang atoll which included water testing that confirmed superior water quality at sites with Tamana pump systems. There is great potential for improved water supply solutions on the atoll as 92% of households there reported using hand held buckets to obtain water from their wells. Sites will now be indentified  where the new Tamama pumps can be installed.

The Government of Kiribati is leading a ‘whole-of-island’ integrated approach to climate change adaptation and disaster risk management. Abaiang atoll is the first site for this approach.Within the integrated approach, SPREP and the Kiribati Ministry of Public Works and Utilities, with project funding from USAID, are aiming to improve water resources capacity in Abaiang. The project will enable communities on the atoll to manage their water supply and better understand the vulnerabilities they are facing from climate change and non-climate related risks.

Also read: Kiribati celebrates World Water Day
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Kiribati people depend on potable well water, this supply has been affected by climate change

Kiribati to Celebrate World Water Day

Kiribati people depend on potable well water, this supply has been affected by climate change

Kiribati people depend on potable well water, this supply has been affected by climate change

Kiribati will be celebrating World Water Day on 24 March 2014 at the Bairiki Square in Kiribati’s capital, Tarawa, focusing on this year’s Kiribati theme ‘Water and Climate Change’.

People in Kiribati depend on potable ground water in wells and from rainwater, but this supply of water has been directly affected by climate change.

The ground water supply in South Tarawa is dependent on the size of the land area and as this diminishes as a result of rising sea levels and coastal erosion, so does the size of the water lens. This situation applies to all of the other islands of Kiribati.

Public Utilities Board (PUB), CEO, Kevin Rouatu said, Kiribati is like a floating ship with limited fresh water from its water lens, and despite the heavy rainfall that Kiribati has been blessed with in the past months, our water lens can only hold just a small percentage of the total rainfall.

“South Tarawa depends largely on the reservoirs in Buota and Bonriki so it is very vital for people to save the water they get from the main water system and not waste it”. Said Kevin Rouatu.

“KAPIII’s objective is to increase the resilience of Kiribati to the impacts of climate change on freshwater supply and coastal protection as a priority by the government of Kiribati”. Said Kautuna Kaitara, Program Manager for KAPIII.

“Our aim is to improve the water reticulation system on South Tarawa through leakage detection and repairs, to increase rainwater harvesting and to build abstraction galleries”, he said.

With regards to sustaining the Buota and Bonriki water reserves, Mr Kaitara said, KAPIII will be assisting in supporting the Government of Kiribati Water Committee by ensuring governance and sustainability of the systems in Bonriki and Buota villages.

“If water in this area is contaminated there will be no drinkable water to the 40 thousand plus population on South Tarawa and it will be catastrophic and costly for the people of South Tarawa compared to the  cost from a tsunami disaster”. Mr Kaitara said.

The Kiribati government through the Ministry of Public Works and Utilities, the Ministry of Health the Kiribati Adaptation Program – Phase III (KAPIII) Public Utilities Board, SMEC and GCCA have joined efforts to make the most of this year’s World Water Day celebrations.

Also read: Reducing leakage in Tarawa, World Water Day 2013, Why Tarawa needs water reserves
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This sea wall is all that protects these homes in the village of Abarao on the island of Tarawa. Copyright: Finn Frandsen, Politiken

Social Dimension of Climate Change

The Minister for Environment, Lands & Agricultural Development and Chairman to Parliamentary Climate Change Committee, Hon. Tiarite Tioti Kwong launched the Kiribati Documentary on Social Dimension of Climate Change on Friday 02 August 2013 at Parliament club, Ambo.

The documentary supported by the EU Global Climate Change Alliance: Pacific Small Island States (GCCA: PSIS) Global Climate project, shows the impacts of climate change on the densely populated island of South Tarawa, Kiribati’s capital.

“Variability is threatening our existence as a nation and people, but Climate Change is now deriving us from the basic necessities of life, water, food, health and our ecosystem,” he said.

“To meet this challenge, all stakeholders within country and externally need to work as one. Mainstreaming climate change into national priorities to be able to come up with focused solutions to work against Climate Change — whether through adaptation investments, technical assistance or public awareness is therefore an urgent call.” Hon Tiarite Tiooti Kwong stated.

Watch the full video below.

Also read…
WHO links climate change and disease increase
Climate Change and Health
Climate Change and People

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Kiribati Road Rehabilitation Project ground breaking in Eita

Kiribati Road Rehabilitation Project underway

Kiribati Road Rehabilitation Project ground breaking in Eita

Local dancers beside the Kiribati Road Rehabilitation Project signboard outside Eita Maneaba during the ground breaking ceremony. Picture Aretitea Teeta/AusAID

The ground breaking ceremony for the Kiribati Road Rehabilitation Project (KRRP) was a success on Friday 26 July 2013 at Eita village, a historic site on Kiribati’s capital, South Tarawa.

“This is an important milestone of achievement, a green light for the go ahead of the actual construction of the road in the upcoming days” said Hon. Kirabuke Teiaua, Minister for Public Works and Utilities in his speech.

The KRRP is a $48.2 million project – funded by AusAID, the World Bank, Asian Development Bank in partnership with the Government of Kiribati – to reconstruct 35 kilometers of road for the 60,000 people living on South Tarawa.

The Kiribati Road Rehabilitation Project  will provide more than 40 per cent of the population with better access to health clinics, schools and markets as well as assist the Government and the people of Kiribati in many ways such as:

  • A significant reduction in road maintenance costs
  • Improvement in health (less noise and dust) and road safety (wider pavement with more bus passing bays)
  • A reduction in travel times
  • Reduced wear and tear on vehicles

Rehabilitation of the road will start when the materials arrive in October and will take about 690 days to complete.

The Kiribati Adaptation Program Phase III (KAPIII) working on freshwater supply and coastal protection has on the other hand identified 8 locations on South Tarawa that is threatening public assets which includes inter alia the road in terms of coastal erosion. Tonkin and Taylor, contracted by the Government of Kiribati will review the designs for coastal protection works on the eight (8) sites identified.

“The arrangements agreed are such that KAPIII will work with the KRRP contractor to build coastal protection works on the eight sites distributed as follows – that works on 6 sites will be implemented by KRRP contractor McConnell Dowell with funds provided by KAPIII while works on the other 2 sites will be contracted out to local contractors.  Construction supervision for the former will be provided by an engineering contractor Roughton Int’l while the latter will be supervised by MPWU through the services of KAPIII Senior Civil Engineer.” KAPIII Program Manager, Kautuna Kaitara said.

Related News…
No potholes in road contract signing
Australia to give $15 million for road

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Kiribati Adaptation Program - Phase III Project Manager Kautuna Kaitara

Why Tarawa needs water reserves

Q&A With Kiribati Adaptation Program – Phase III Project Manager Kautuna Kaitara

What is a water reserve?

A water reserve is an area of land that is reserved for the extraction of water. That is, no other activities are allowed on this land except pumping of water.

What is the purpose of a water reserve?

The purpose of declaring a water reserve is to minimise pollution of the water in this area. Water reserves are common throughout the world – in Australia the catchment areas for dams are normally some sort of reserve area.

Why is it important to have water reserves in Kiribati?

In Kiribati it is extremely important because we only have very limited water treatment and to provide additional treatment would be extremely expensive in terms of both initial outlay and operating expenses.

We want people to be healthy and have healthy drinking water. That’s why it is important to stop people toileting on the land, and pigs and other livestock using the land because that can introduce potentially very harmful bacteria. Agricultural activities, such as growing of vegetables, can also introduce harmful chemicals such as nitrates.

These aren’t the only issues. The mining of sand and gravel from the area can introduce pollutants in the process, and leaves the lens much more vulnerable because it removes a layer of protection of the water. Industrial and other activities, such as fixing of cars and letting cars die on the reserves, can also introduce very harmful chemicals and petrochemicals.

Why is ground water on South Tarawa polluted?

Given that the population density of South Tarawa is so high, and polluting activities take place on almost all the land of South Tarawa, the water lens underlying South Tarawa is extremely polluted and is not suitable for human consumption, probably even after boiling. There used to be water reserves at Betio and Teaoreareke as well as Buota and Bonriki, but the first two had to be abandoned due to population growth. The water reserves are 50-metres or more inland from the edge of the land so you would need considerable overtopping before they are affected and there are people living on the edge who will be affected long before climate change affects the water reserves.

Is there an unlimited supply of water in the water reserve?

No. The other important factor with the water lenses are that they have a limited holding capacity and if you overpump them it causes the mixing of the fresh and salt water. This will take a generation to repair if it is well mixed. It is critical that the water reserves are not extracted beyond the sustainable yield.

Facts about KAPIII

The Kiribati Adaptation Program- Phase III (KAPIII) is a five-year project under the Office of the President and funded via the World Bank GEF LDCF Trust Fund with co financing from the governments of Australia and Japan, the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery partnership, as well as in-kind from the Government of Kiribati.

The objective of KAPIII is to improve the resilience of Kiribati to the impacts of climate change on freshwater supply and coastal infrastructure.

Freshwater supply projects from 2012 to 2016 include working closely with the MPWU and PUB to manage assets and provide training to staff, the installation of four new rainwater harvesting works and two infiltration gallery works in North and South Tarawa, the detection and repair of leaks in the groundwater pipe system from Buota to Betio and the rehabilitation of the Buota Water Reserve.